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Survive-All Fallout Shelter Radio Ads

The international struggles of our world may lead to… (ka-boom) NUCLEAR HOLOCAUST!

Nothing lends itself better to a fear-based advertising campaign than your family’s radioactive death. So when the Mort Kridel Advertising Agency was asked to create a radio ad campaign for Survive-All Fallout Shelters, they did their PR-darnedest to scare the Wonder Bread crap out of nuclear families everywhere. Tense horn stabs and canned explosions bracket sales pitches like:

Radioactive fallout, that deadly by-product of a nuclear attack, will kill literally millions of unprotected families in the event of an atomic attack. Is YOUR family protected? Do YOU have a fallout shelter?

Each Civil defense approved, basement-type, Do-It-Yourself fallout shelter includes: A complete fully-stocked first aid kit! Extra strength saran and rayon bunks! A radiation meter and individual dosimeters!

Civil defense approved, FHA approved, no money down, five years to pay!

Economical… but Priceless!

These are ripped from the original LP that would have gone to radio stations from the ad agency. There are 6 long versions and 3 shortened versions, each fairly different. Since it was promotional there was no record cover, but a scan of the record’s label is included.  No year is evident, but since the zip code is two digits, it’s presumably pre-1963, and I would guess late 1950’s.

  1. Maximum Protection (General)
  2. Comparison
  3. Value
  4. Equipment
  5. DYS
  6. Maximum Protection (Steel and Concrete)
  7. DYS (short)
  8. Maximum Protection (Steel and Concrete) (short)
  9. Maximum Protection (General) (short)
  10. Survive-All Shelters Radio Ads LP Label

Survive-All Shelters Radio Ads.zip

The Trojan Story

[The Trojan Story front cover] Trojan Records was founded in 1967 by Jamaican-English producer Lee Gopthal as something of a sister label to Chris Blackwell’s Island Records. It became one of the best-known and successful reggae labels, but it also bought out several independent Jamaican labels and ended up with a pretty good ska and rock-steady back catalog. In 1972, it went through these archives and put out a fantastic (if somewhat inaccurately-named) compilation, The Trojan Story.

Although the liner notes were somewhat sparse and the sound rough, you couldn’t want a better overview of 1960s Jamaican music. The first tracks, from 1961, are embryonic ska in which you can hear the R & B influence; it takes us through the height of ska to its migration to rock-steady, and then winding up with early reggae (it even includes what could be called the “original” rock-steady and reggae songs: Alton Ellis’s “Rock Steady” and The Maytals’ “Do the Reggay”, respectively).

The three-disk box was only in print for a short time, and was reissued briefly in 1980 (in 1976, Trojan released a different compilation and also called it The Trojan Story, ensuring eternal confusion). In 1988, it was released on a 2-CD set, which also quickly went out of print; copies today sell for $50–75.

I’ve had the LP set for some time, but I was trying to track down a copy of the CD for the last few years. I finally found a reasonably priced copy, and the sound was awful. It’s one of the worst mastering jobs I’ve ever heard. They didn’t go back to the original masters, but clearly just copied the LP, and didn’t even do a very good job of that. The copy I made off my LP sounded much better. So that’s what we have here. Be sure to at least check out “Housewives’ Choice” and “The Great Wuga Wuga”. Also Jimmy Cliff when he was just 14!

  1. Laurel Aitken and the Carib Beats – Bartender [1961]
  2. Derrick Morgan – Fat Man [1961]
  3. Eric “Humpty Dumpty” Morris and the Drumbago All Stars – Humpty Dumpty [1961]
  4. Jimmy Cliff – Miss Jamaica [1962]
  5. Derrick and Patsy – Housewives’ Choice [1962]
  6. Jackie Edwards – Tell Me Darling [1963]
  7. Kentrick Patrick – Don’t Stay Out Too Late [1963]
  8. The Stranger and The Duke Reid Band – Rough and Tough [1963]
  9. Kentrick Patrick – Man to Man [1963]
  10. Stranger Cole – Unos-Dos-Tres [1964]
  11. The Skatalites – Confucius [1966]
  12. The Mellow Larks – Time to Pray (Alleluia) [1961]
  13. The Blues Busters – Soon You’ll Be Gone [1965]
  14. Lord Tanamo – I’m in the Mood for Ska [1965]
  15. The Riots – Yeah Yeah [1965]
  16. Don Drummond – Man in the Street [1965]
  17. Baba Brooks and His Band – One-Eyed Giant [1967]
  18. Honeyboy Martin and the Voices with Tommy McCook and the Supersonics – Dreader Than Dread [1967]
  19. Owen Gray – Darling Patricia [1962]
  20. Joe White and Chuck with the Baba Brooks Band – Every Night [1966]
  21. The Astronauts – Syncopate [1966]
  22. The Clarendonians – Rules of Life [1966]
  23. Slim Smith – The New Boss [1966]
  24. Winston and George – Keep the Pressure On [1966]
  25. Roy Shirley – Musical Train [1967]
  26. The Techniques – Oh Babe [1966]
  27. Sir Lord Comic – The Great Wuga Wuga [1967]
  28. Dandy – Rudy, a Message to You [1967]
  29. The Ethiopians – Train to Skaville [1967]
  30. The Three Tops – It’s Raining [1966]
  31. The Ethiopians – The Whip [1967]
  32. Desmond Dekker and the Aces – Pretty Africa [1967]
  33. Alton Ellis – Rock Steady [1966]
  34. Baba Brooks and His Band – King Size [1966]
  35. Evan & Jerry with The Carib Beats – Rock Steady Train [1967]
  36. Sugar Simone – King Without a Throne [1967]
  37. Phyllis Dillon with Tommy McCook and The Supersonics – Perfidia [1967]
  38. Derrick Morgan – Do the Beng Beng [1968]
  39. Lynn Taitt – Way of Life [1968]
  40. The Tennors – I’ve Got to Get You Off My Mind [1968]
  41. Lee “King” Perry – People Funny Boy [1968]
  42. The Supersonics – Second Fiddle [1968]
  43. The Maytals – Do the Reggay [1968]
  44. The Slickers – Nana [1968]
  45. The Pioneers – Mama Look [1969]
  46. The Maytals – Pressure Drop [1970]
  47. The Maytones – Black and White [1971]
  48. The Charmers – Rasta Never Fails [1971]